The Perfect Title

The title is the first piece of information someone gets about your book, and it often forms the reader’s judgment about your book. The title is the first thing the reader sees or hears about your book—even before the cover in most cases—and getting it right is possibly the most important single book marketing decision you’ll make (even though most people don’t think about it as marketing). Let’s be clear about this: A good title won’t make your book do well. But a bad title will almost certainly prevent it from doing well.

We think of authors as masters of words. Yet dozens of authors have the feeling that they are inadequate… that they feel at a loss for words when it comes to nailing a great title and subtitle for their non-fiction book.

Creating a great title and subtitle for a non-fiction book is a real talented art. It’s common to spend hours together to tease and squeeze the title and subtitle out into the open. The perfect words almost always come from something they say randomly and spontaneously. Try to listen very carefully, taking lots of notes, and then play around with the rhythm and sound of the words until something just ‘hits’. When you get it right, the response from the client is truly rewarding. That’s when you know the title is a winner.

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Ep 018: Steve Scott: How do I generate multiple book ideas and decide on my book’s final topic?

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In this episode, we sit down with Steve Scott to discuss how to facilitate the process of generating multiple book ideas in order to ultimately decide on your book’s topic. As the founder of the incredibly resourceful Authority Self Publishing and the author of 69 books, Steve is a seasoned veteran when it comes to conjuring up content ideas. Join us as he shares his insightful tips, including using research to uncover your audience’s most pressing questions and making use of Google’s keyword planner to figure out what you should be writing about.
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